Review: Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince

Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince

What’s the big deal?

“Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince” is an action fantasy film released in 2009 and is the sixth film in the Harry Potter series. Adapted from the novel of the same name by J.K. Rowling, the film is directed once again by David Yates and sees Harry discover the secret to defeating Voldemort as the Dark Lord’s forces begin to wage war on wizards and Muggles alike. Like the previous films in the series, it was a commercial and critical success and went to become the second highest grossing movie of the year behind “Avatar”.

Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince

It grossed more than £934 million worldwide, making it one of the most successful movies of all time behind fellow Harry Potters films “Order Of The Phoenix”, “The Philosopher’s Stone” and both parts of “The Deathly Hallows” which concludes the series.

What’s it about?

Harry accompanies Professor Dumbledore to recruit a new Potions professor, Horace Slughorn, after Professor Snape is promoted to Defence Against The Dark Arts. But Harry’s attention is diverted when he believes that Voldemort has made Draco Malfoy into a Death Eater, despite the scepticism of friends Hermione and Ron. As their sixth year at Hogwarts begins, Harry stumbles across an old textbook belonging to someone calling themselves ‘the Half-Blood Prince’ which contains instructions and notes which benefit Harry enormously. Meanwhile, Ron finally becomes a Quidditch star player and begins a relationship with a girl called Lavender Brown – which upsets Hermione.

Dumbledore later reveals to Harry that Slughorn contains powerful memories which might prove useful in the fight against Voldemort but the pair of them are running out of time. With the Dark Lord preparing to launch an assault on Hogwarts itself, can Harry unlock the secret to defeating Voldemort or will all hope be lost?

Main Cast
Actor
Role
Daniel Radcliffe
Harry Potter
Emma Watson
Hermione Granger
Rupert Grint
Ron Weasley
Michael Gambon
Professor Albus Dumbledore
Tom Felton
Draco Malfoy
Alan Rickman
Professor Severus Snape
Helena Bonham Carter
Bellatrix Lestrange
Ralph Fiennes
Lord Voldemort
Jim Broadbent
Professor Horace Slughorn

Director
David Yates
Screenplay
Steve Kloves *
Running Time
153 minutes
Release Date (UK)
15th July, 2009
Genre
Action, Fantasy, Mystery
Academy Award Nomination
Best Cinematography

What’s to like?

Well, you can’t deny that the films certainly look the business now. Spreading beyond the enchanted walls of Hogwarts makes “The Half-Blood Prince” feel a bit more grand in scale, hinting at the rising stakes in the story. Costumes and set design all match the previously established standards and those of you fed up of keeping tabs on all the new characters will be pleased to know that such additions to the cast are kept to a minimum. Broadbent feels at home as the absent-minded Slughorn but personally, the film’s MVP is Felton who really steps up and becomes much more than the annoying kid we knew in “Chamber Of Secrets”. Finally given some significant screen-time, Felton has quietly become one of the series’ most reliable performers and this is definitely his finest hour.

Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince

The film makes good use of the story’s foreboding atmosphere, with scenes shot in a dark and almost colourless hue. And the story is brilliantly written as it ties up the unnecessary loose ends but without spoiling the epic finale – indeed, it continues to raise the stakes from beginning to shocking conclusion.

What’s not to like?

Gathering clouds are all well and good but not if you’re waiting for a full-on storm. “The Half-Blood Prince” offers us a brief glimpse of the sort of action we can expect from “The Deathly Hallows” but it does feel like a two hour-plus trailer for the final two films. I wanted more from it than yet more backstory and the odd magical shoot-out but it sticks too closely to the tried-and-tested formula of previous Harry Potters.

There are also too many characters in the series now so a lot of your old favourites (like Mad-Eye Moody, for example) are notable by their absence. And for me, this film doesn’t push on into becoming something greater. Maybe these films are getting too generic – I’ll let you into a little secret. I actually watched this before I saw “Order Of The Phoenix” and wasn’t aware of that until about halfway through. Although it works hard to concentrate on the forthcoming Harry vs Voldemort conflict, it still feels bogged down by backstory and classroom antics.

Should I watch it?

Despite concerns about excessive padding, “The Half-Blood Prince” is still a worthy addition to the series. It may only be a precursor to “The Deathly Hallows” but this film offers enough action, intrigue and plot twists to make sure we’ll be around for the final chapter. The Harry Potter films are becoming a bit like Swiss watches – beautifully made and wonderfully reliable but you struggle to tell one apart from another…

Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince

Great For: patient action fans, Potter lovers, Goths

Not So Great For: people waiting for the final films, younger viewers

What else should I watch?

There’s no denying that “The Half-Blood Prince” leads on into “Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part One” as well as it could do, making the forthcoming showdown more personal and intense than ever before. The final two films heavily indulge the action fans out there (like me) with plenty of battle scenes and action sequences including the long-awaiting Battle of Hogwarts.

The contrast between these later movies and the family-friendly lightness of “Harry Potter And The Philosopher’s Stone” could not be much greater. The first film is a riot of colour, spectacle and fun – the darkest that film gets is Snape sneering in class. These later films, by contrast, aren’t as much fun but offer a deeper and more satisfying narrative and feature much more assured performances from the young cast.

Review: Die Hard With A Vengeance | scott-bakula.com

Die Hard With A Vengeance

What’s the big deal?

“Die Hard With A Vengeance” is an action thriller film released in 1995 and is the third film in the Die Hard series. Reuniting Bruce Willis with the director of the first movie John McTiernan, the film sees Willis reprise once again as New York cop John McClane who this time is sent on a wild goose chase around the city at the behest of someone calling themselves ‘Simon’.

Die Hard With A Vengeance

Despite mixed reviews upon release, it became the most successful film in the series thus far although there would be a twelve year hiatus between it and the next film in the series, “Live Free Or Die Hard”.

What’s it about?

John McClane has hit rough times. Newly estranged once again from his wife Holly and the kids, his ill discipline forces his superior officer at the NYPD – Inspector Walter Cobb – to suspend McClane from active duty. But it doesn’t last – a bomb goes off during the morning rush hour and Cobb receives a call from the man claiming responsibility, Simon. Simon orders Cobb to take McClane to Harlem and drop him off wearing a somewhat provocative sandwich board otherwise more bombs will be detonated across the city. Cobb complies and McClane is rescued from the locals by store owner Zeus Carver who takes McClane back to his precinct.

Simon calls back, leaving several riddles for McClane and Carver to solve whilst the police try to deal with the hidden bombs. But all of this is merely a ruse – Simon is really interested in committing the robbery of the century by emptying the Federal Reserve Bank of its gold deposits. As McClane and Carver get increasingly tested by Simon, it emerges that Simon’s interest in McClane is deeply personal…

Main Cast

Actor
Role
Bruce Willis
John McClane
Samuel L. Jackson
Zeus Carver
Jeremy Irons
Simon Gruber
Graham Greene
Joe Lambert
Colleen Camp
Connie Kowalski
Larry Bryggman
Inspector Walter Cobb
Sam Phillips
Katya
Technical Info

Director
John McTiernan
Screenplay
Jonathon Hensleigh *
Running Time
131 minutes
Release date (UK)
18th August, 1995
Genre
Action, Thriller

What’s to like?

It can’t be easy trying to follow one of the greatest action movies ever made in “Die Hard” – just ask Renny Harlin after “Die Hard 2″ but this at least has some of the old magic back. The ludicrous action scenes, the overly complicated and intricately planned heist and McClane’s world-weary humour are all back for another outing and it’s much closer to the original. It’s also brighter, meaning that we can see every ricochet and explosion in full Technicolor glory as terrified civilians run for their lives. The film has no messing about at all, throwing us straight in at the deep end with the initial bombing and it never lets up for a second until the credits start to roll.

Die Hard With A Vengeance

With McClane now having a partner of sorts in Zeus, the movie takes on a different dynamic but thankfully, it still works. Willis and Jackson are excellent performers in their own right and they generate enough chemistry between them to engage an audience. Conversely, Irons hams it up deliciously as Simon with the sort of German accent I normally associate with the sitcom “Dad’s Army” but despite the pantomime villainy, he’s actually good value for money. Like Rickman, he’s calm and professional at all times and like Rickman, a good foe for Willis to clash with.

What’s not to like?

Sadly, it isn’t a complete return to form. Willis still feels utterly invincible, despite the amount of blood he gets on his trademark vest. The action really does get turned to eleven but it doesn’t flow as well as I hoped it might, as though the action scenes were thought up first and then had the story written around them to link them together. By the time of the ending, it has lost its way completely and has reverted back to action genre stereotypes.

The other thing about the action, while still full of old-school stunts and pyrotechnics, is that it also seems a little lacking compared to the first one. They simply look unbelievable and so you don’t invest in the picture the way you did when Willis was stuck up Nakatomi Plaza. The magic has gone and while everyone is trying really hard, it can’t generate that spark you felt with “Die Hard”. It’s an improvement on “Die Hard 2″ but it fails to compete with the first film, settling quite comfortably somewhere in between the two.

Should I watch it?

Bombastic and full of the sort of havoc we associate with the series, “Die Hard With A Vengeance” is a worthy addition to the franchise. It doesn’t fully recapture the first film’s class but it is a solid and explosive action film which will satisfy most audience goers. As it is, it’s arguably the best of the Die Hard sequels so far.

Die Hard With A Vengeance

Great For: action fans, New Yorkers, people who don’t pay too much attention to plot

Not So Great For: screenwriting students, intellectuals

What else should I watch?

This and “Die Hard” are the two best films in the series and the only two you should probably watch. “Die Hard 2″ is OK but not great while “Live Free Or Die Hard” and “A Good Day To Die Hard” are both pale imitations. Hopefully, we’ve seen the last of John McClane but somehow, I doubt it.

There are no shortage of other action movies to tickle your fancy. The “Lethal Weapon” series offers both exciting action and a good double act in Mel Gibson and Danny Glover. Samuel L. Jackson even gets another go in the oft-forgotten “Long Kiss Goodnight” which is much better than people remember. More modern movie goers will prefer stuff like “The Matrix” with its sci-fi leanings and “Taken” for its sheer brutality.

Review: Captain America: The Winter Soldier | Scott-Bakula.com

Captain America: The Winter Soldier

What’s the big deal?

“Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is an action superhero thriller film released in 2014 and is the second solo film for the Marvel character of the same name. It is the third film in Phase Two of Marvel’s Cinematic Universe (MCU), a single continuity running between all previous and future productions by Marvel Studios. Like its predecessor “Captain America: The First Avenger”, it features Chris Evans returning as Steve Rogers, a WW2 infantryman turned into a ‘super soldier’ by use of a serum, who now works for SHIELD in the present day.

Captain America: The Winter Soldier

Like most Marvel films, it was a critical and financial success and is heavily influenced by conspiracy fiction films from the 70’s like “Three Days Of The Condor” which, coincidentally, also stared Robert Redford. The film also introduces a new hero in the form of Falcon, played by Anthony Mackie.

What’s it about?

Two years after the events shown in “The Avengers”, Steve Rogers is now slowly adjusting to life in the 21st century while working with espionage agency SHIELD under director Nick Fury. During a mission alongside Natasha Romanoff, Rogers discovers that she has a hidden agenda of her own, a secret assignment given to her by Fury. Confronting the director back at SHIELD HQ, Rogers is given access to Project Insight – a secret plan to build three state-of-the-art Heli Carriers to assess and eliminate all threats to SHIELD in a matter of moments. Disgusted, Rogers walks away and wants no part of it.

Shortly after, Nick Fury is attacked by a mysterious assassin called the Winter Soldier. Now realising that SHIELD has been compromised, Fury hands Rogers and Romanoff encrypted data that SHIELD’s enemies would love to have. Asked by Security Council member Alexander Pierce to hand the data over, Rogers escapes and goes on the run and hunt down the Winter Soldier himself. But who exactly can he trust and what price must be paid for freedom?

Main Cast

Actor
Role
Chris Evans
Steve Rogers / Captain America
Samuel L Jackson
Nick Fury
Scarlett Johansson
Natasha Romanoff / Black Widow
Robert Redford
Alexander Pierce
Sebastian Stan
Bucky Barnes
Anthony Mackie
Sam Wilson / Falcon
Cobie Smulders
Agent Maria Hill
Maximiliano Hernandez
Agent Jasper Sitwell
Emily VanCamp
Sharon Carter / Agent 13
Technical Info

Directors
Anthony & James Russo
Screenplay
Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely *
Running Time
136 minutes
Release Date (UK)
26th March, 2014
Genre
Action, Superhero, Thriller
Academy Award Nomination
Best Visual Effects

What’s to like?

Just as “The Avengers” saw upheaval in the MCU, so too does “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”. Assuming that you don’t watch “Marvel’s Agents Of SHIELD” on TV then the truth behind the conspiracy is a stunning one and one which will have ramifications for most MCU films from here on out. Such dramatic implications lifts this far beyond a simple action film and gives the movie a level of tension and intrigue that “Thor: The Dark World” can only dream of. It also gives Evans much more to do than simply bashing stuff with his shield and he excels as Rogers, finally convincing us that he is a man from another time and struggling to understand today’s world.

Captain America: The Winter Soldier

Newcomer Mackie makes a welcome addition to the MCU, giving it its first proper black superhero and about time too. Johansson is always a joy to watch and like Evans, she has to rely on more than fancy martial arts this time as well. Her and Evans make a good team and one I’d like to see more of in future, however unlikely that may seem. The action is also outstanding, probably the best that Marvel has so far given us. It’s reminiscent of “The Bourne Identity” at times which is not a bad film to replicate. It’s quick, brutal and extremely satisfying for action fans like me.

What’s not to like?

There are one or two things I would have addressed, however. Firstly, why go to all that trouble of the big reveal about the Winter Soldier when the game is given up so easily? Even IMDb lists the cast member playing the assassin (a temptation I resisted) and not all of us are Marvel geeks. We do like a surprise every now and again so I feel Marvel have mishandled that one.

There is also precious little humour in it. Apart from the obligatory Stan Lee cameo, I can’t recall a single light moment from the movie although I’m sure they are in there somewhere. This is a much darker proposition than “Captain America: The First Avenger” which is decidedly comic book in tone. This film has none of the lightness we saw in the first film and I feel that’s a shame. And as blasphemous as it may be to criticise a Hollywood legend but Redford’s role as the slimy Pierce didn’t seem right to me. A bit more disguising of the truth was necessary, I reckon, unless Marvel were (God forbid!) trying to dumb down the plot.

Should I watch it?

If you wish to carry on with the MCU experience then this is an essential watch. It’s gripping from the start, exciting and at times, breath-taking to watch. I just wish that it wouldn’t make it so easy to tell what was going to happen. Remember the voice-over from “Blade Runner” ruining things at the studio’s insistence? The same thing happened here – Marvel gave the game away too easily and I would have hoped that they could trust us to figure it out for ourselves. But still an excellent addition to their already bulging back catalogue.

Captain America: The Winter Soldier

Great For: people who miss “The X-Files”, the MCU in general, action fans

Not So Great For: people who enjoyed the first Captain America movie, people who watch “Agents Of SHIELD”

What else should I watch?

Continuing the next phase of the MCU’s Phase Two is “Guardians Of The Galaxy”, an intergalactic space opera with its tongue firmly in cheek. It couldn’t be any more different to this if it tried but it is an absolute blast of fun and highly recommended.

The first “Captain America” was a much lighter affair in tone, set during an alternative WW2 against maniacal nemesis the Red Skull. It had a fine performance from Hugo Weaving as the baddie, just as visceral action scenes and employed a comic touch that was used to good effect. Really, it depends which style of Cap you prefer and for me, his first outing just about shades it in terms of fun.

Review: A View To A Kill | scott-bakula.com

Review: A View To A Kill

What’s the big deal?

“A View To A Kill” is an action thriller film released in 1985 and is the fourteenth entry in the James Bond series. It features Roger Moore returning as 007 for the last time, facing off against an insane industrialist who wishes to destroy Silicon Valley near San Francisco.

A View To A Kill

The title is adapted from a short story written by Ian Fleming although the film’s plot is original. It earned mixed reviews upon release but was a commercial success with the film’s theme tune by Duran Duran especially well received. It also marked the last appearance of Lois Maxwell as Miss Moneypenny but the film was the debut for Dolph Lundgren who would go on to appear in the likes of “Universal Soldier” and “The Expendables” franchise.

What’s it about?

In deepest Siberia, British secret agent James Bond recovers a Soviet microchip which turns out to be a copy of a chip manufactured by Zorin Industries, designed to withstand an electromagnetic pulse. Along with fellow MI6 agent Sir Godfrey Tibbett, Bond visits the company owner Max Zorin at a race meeting where Bond begins to suspect that some of Zorin’s horses have been fed performance-enhancing drugs. While investigating further, Zorin learns of Bond’s true identity and has his personal bodyguard May Day attempt to assassinate both him and Sir Godfrey.

Escaping from Zorin’s estate but unable to save Sir Godfrey, Bond pursues Zorin to San Francisco where he encounters State Geologist Stacey Sutton who is trying to resist Zorin buying her land near the San Andreas Fault. Working together, they come to suspect that Zorin’s plans involve a bit more than doped horses but are they too late to stop him? With time running out, the fate of millions rests once again with Bond…

Main Cast
Actor
Role
Roger Moore
James Bond
Christopher Walken
Max Zorin
Grace Jones
May Day
Tanya Roberts
Stacey Sutton
Patrick Macnee
Sir Godfrey Tibbett
Patrick Bauchau
Scarpine, Zorin’s henchman
Willoughby Gray
Dr Carl Mortner, Zorin’s physician
Technical Info

Director
John Glen
Screenplay
Richard Maibaum & Michael G. Wilson *
Running Time
131 minutes
Release Date (UK)
13th June, 1985
Genre
Action, Thriller
Razzie Award Nomination
Worst Actress (Tanya Roberts)

What’s to like?

For all the criticism that Bond films, including this one, receive then it’s reassuring that you can virtually guarantee a high quality production. It’s well-shot, well-polished and despite its faults, it is still fun if you’ve the right mind-set. Over time, Bond has become as familiar to us as a long-lost uncle who occasionally turns up, entertains everyone for a few hours with the same old jokes before disappearing into the night again. There’s a comfort to be had watching a Bond film and Moore’s films especially. There’re not great but at least they don’t take themselves too seriously.

A View To A Kill

The action remains one of the few highlights to be found in “A View To A Kill” which has an energetic chase up and down the Eiffel Tower in Paris, not one but two car chases that defy all logic and feel a bit farcical and a gripping fight atop San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge. Sure enough, they all enjoy on some levels but none of them really engage you like the free-falling fight from “Moonraker” or the confrontation between Bond and Oddjob deep in the heart of Fort Knox in “Goldfinger”. The whole thing feels sterile and too predictable.

What’s not to like?

Walken, a much better actor than he demonstrates here, is a complete loose cannon but gives the movie no real threat because he spends a lot of time killing his own people. The two lead Bond girls – Jones and Roberts – are opposite sides of the same coin but neither are particularly convincing. Roberts is especially bad, coming across as little more than a dumb blonde bewildered by everything she sees and hangs on Bond’s every word. The story isn’t the strongest as it completely fails to tie up all its loose ends – why spend the first quarter of the movie talking about Zorin’s horses when no mention is ever made of them again?

Moore, looking like his own melting waxwork figure, is far too old to be playing Bond at this stage – so old that the various love scenes make you feel queasy at the vast age gaps between the actors (Moore said he decided to quit when he found out he was older than Tanya Roberts’ mother). But before he went, Moore decided that he may as well go all-out on the comedy front – and sure enough, there isn’t a single opportunity for a sickening innuendo missed in the movie. The whole film feels as though it was produced remotely, with little interest in the cast or crew. It looks OK for the undemanding viewer but Bond fans were hoping for – and frankly, deserving – much better than this.

Should I watch it?

“A View To A Kill” is as old-fashioned and out-of-touch as its leading actor, who was longer in the tooth than the Charleston by this point. It feels tired and out of ideas, hoping that enough action sequences will distract us from an unengaging cast, uninteresting story and inept direction. The only thing that saves it is the stunt work and the theme tune by Duran Duran – a sure-fire sign that a movie has real problems.

A View To A Kill

Great For: the people of San Francisco, Timothy Dalton, 80’s themed party nights

Not So Great For: Bond fans, Parisian taxi drives, Roger Moore

What else should I watch?

For those viewers who enjoyed Moore’s tenure, it must be a shame that he bowed out of the series in such dreadful fashion. His best film – “The Spy Who Loved Me” – is a great Bond film which combines a good story with memorable locations, terrific action and the greatest henchman in the entire series in Jaws. I say, watch that and wish that they could have got it right more than once…

Traditional fans like myself will argue that Sean Connery’s “Goldfinger” is the best Bond yet but modern fans could argue that the likes of “Casino Royale” and “Skyfall” give the old boy a run for its money. The former is a dark and brooding thriller that finally gets the tone of Fleming’s work spot on while the latter is an exciting blend of story, action and tension.

Scott Bakula stars who voted almost in Doctor Who

Scott Bakula stars who voted almost in Doctor Who

During its long history, the doctor who introduced many famous faces. John Cleese, Brian Blessed, Derek Jacobi, Kylie Minogue, Claire Bloom and Michael Gambon has the appearance of placed in all, among many others. Occasionally, celebrities have alsolent their voices to an episode. Among other things, Brian Cox, Michael Sheen, ImeldaStaunton and, more recently, Ian McKellen. And from time to time, the doctor that can serve as a springboard for young talents. Carey Mulligan got her big break with the role of its own in 2007 features a snap.

But there are also a number of stars have been considered part of the comment butwho, for one reason or another didn’t show up. Here are ten of them.
Known as the time-travelling doctor Sam Beckett, quantum leap and Captain JonathanArcher Star Trek: Enterprise, Scott Bakula is no stranger to science fiction. It istherefore not surprising that it was once regarded as for a role in Doctor Who. Heoffered the part of Isaac, the noble Sheriff in the episode of this season A town calledMercy. At a Star Trek Convention, Bakula explained that he is a fan of the series andthat she wanted the part, but the dates of filming clashed with other commitments.The role was ultimately for Farscape and Stargate SG – 1 star Ben Browder.
It would have been interesting to see the doctor face to face with Sam Beckett. Ofcourse, it could somewhat strange given that the doctor can go anywhere in time andspace and Beckett is limited to his own life. Is there such a thing as the urge to traveltime?

Guest Star Scott Bakula “Desperate Housewives” teases drama beyond the hearing room

Guest Star Scott Bakula “Desperate Housewives” teases drama beyond the hearing room

 

The actor explains why he took the party as counsel for the defence of Bree on the final episodes of the ABC series and teases romantic plot of the characters.

 

http://scott-bakula.com/

 

It is hard to ignore that, while a judicial drama was unfolding for producers of Desperate Housewives in real life, it begins to unfold on the final season of the ABC drama. That the moment is not lost on the guest star Scott Bakula, who plays travel, Bree (Marcia Cross) lawyer, on the final episodes of the series of defence.

 

[Creator Marc Cherry] has not said that to me specifically, but I do not know how he could be a part of his psyche, Bakula tells The Hollywood Reporter of how the trial of Nicollette Sheridan may have influenced dramatic of the Court of the series. “Most of the authors take stuff and they mix it up in what they write you.” Thus, it seems that it is twisted ironically we would do a court case while he was dealing with questions of the Court. »

 

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It remains to be seen how the Court experience is translated to the screen and Bakula said viewers will have enough time to dissect the procedure that the show is not just skimping on the trial for murder of Bree.

 

It is quite drawn out and rather long, he said. It‘s pretty upcoming courtroom that everyone who had to turn and be in were sick of it.

 

There are so many ways you can pull things from the courtroom too, he continues. “We got there and did the best we could and made as interesting as we could. And they were written in such a way that I think that the guard certainly moving. «But, of course, is Desperate Housewives, so it has surprises in court, it is indicated in the Court and there are breathless moments in the Court – all kinds of stuff really great court, that you can imagine that Desperate Housewives would end with»

 

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The actor – who has charmed the public science fiction with his roles featured on quantum leap and Star Trek: Enterprise – told cherry that appear on the show for years and he had pretty much abandoned after hearing it would be his last season. So not only was he thrilled to get the call of the guest star, but also that he was pleased to see the role that he would play.

 

“It was not as I would have taken part,” he said. “But the fact that it was a beautiful party, and I think that the journey is well written and there were opportunities for humor and for some sexuality and stuff of relationship with Marcia which comes into play, which makes it fun.”

 

So clear viewers can expect the action between trip and Bree extends beyond the courtroom. I think it is fair to say that there are some exploration there», teases Bakula.

Scott Bakula think Sam ‘in Bond’ ‘ is still jumping around in time?

Scott Bakula think Sam ‘in Bond’

Two old friends met on “NCIS: New Orleans” this season when Dean Stockwell guest-stars in new series of crime of Scott Bakula. The pair played on “Quantum Leap” for five seasons together in the 1990s, and while they stayed in contact over the years, Bakula tells Zap2it that learn to work together again was wonderful.
“I’ve only worked with Dean again because we stopped“Quantum Leap”,” Bakula says: break from filming on-site in New Orleans. ‘ He invited in an episode of ‘Enterprise’ and who was fantastic, but it was probably 10 years ago. I saw it years, we are talking about, but it is so fun to watch him do his thing and be around him. “
What says Bakula was the best part of the experience of ‘NCIS’ was in fact what happened behind the scenes. James Whitmore Jr. directed the episode of “NCIS: New Orleans”, entitled “Chasing Ghosts,” but he was also the Director of 15 episodes of “Quantum Leap”, including the two parties Oswald episode and the episode of ‘Jimmy’ classic, where Sam leaps into a young man with Down’s Syndrome.
“” “[Whitmore] and I have a ton of history in terms of some wonderful episodes, he shot for us on”Quantum Leap”,” says Bakula, ‘ it is staged for us on NCIS: New Orleans now, I‘m very pleased to have around him.
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Naturally, three former colleagues had much to discuss.
“We our scenes shot in the morning, then broke and went to lunch and has talked for about an hour on the old times… between the three
We there was lot of current history, a lot of good memories,”says Bakula. “It was justone of these days that makes it all worthwhile, where there‘s something magic going it’s just about relationships and people who care about each other.
Making ‘Leap’ was difficult, it was hard eachseason, because he was so ambitious and you go through this experience with a group of people and you become closer. Dean and I was like brothers, it was wonderful to see. “
Conversation se tourne vers la finale de la série de “Quantum Leap”, Whitmore (maillot noir sur la photo) a également ordonné et qui est l’une des meilleures séries finale dans l’histoire de la télévision – but il devient encore plus incroyable après que Bakula relaie la situation entourant son épisode final.

“Je pense que si les gens comprennent les circonstances que Donald Bellisario (le créateur) a écrit que l’épisode sous – nous ne savions pas que nous avons été annulé à l’époque, » dit Bakula. « C’est plus la norme maintenant, ils savent que c’est leur dernière saison, donc ils peuvent s’enrouler vers le haut loose ends ». Mais nous ne savions pas qui.

“Donc Don dû écrire un épisode de cette série qui nous permettrait de revenir si ils ont choisi est en place, ou elle permettrait pour un avenir si il allait être un film, ou lui permettre d’être aussi un épisode final si cela devait être le cas. » Je me sens comme si vous regardez l’épisode compte tenu de ces informations, il devient encore plus spectaculaire.

“Il quitte portes ouvertes, il a enveloppé certaines choses, il a fait les gens se sentent bien, il y avait une tonne d’émotion en elle – c’était juste une métaphore pour le spectacle qui continue et se nourrit à ce jour. » “Fans là-bas ou des gens comme Sam sont là-bas va autour et rendre les choses juste pour d’autres personnes.”

Scott Bakula Biography – Scott-Bakula.com

Scott Bakula

Actor, stage actor, television actor (1954-)
Scott Bakula is best known for her role as Dr. Sam Beckett in the popular television series Quantum Leap.
Synopsis
Actor Scott Bakula is born on October 9, 1954, in St. Louis, Missouri. A veteran actor, Bakula is perhaps best known for his work on television, starring in series like Quantum Leap, Star Trek: Enterprise and the men of a Certain age.
Career and early life
Born October 9, 1954, in St. Louis, Missouri, Scott Stewart Bakula developed an interest in performing at an early age, appearing in productions local churches and create his own musical groups. At school, he also proved a strong athlete. Bakula plays tennis, soccer and baseball. During his stay at Kirkwood High School, he was member of the swimming team. He also loved to do water skiing.
The son of a lawyer, Bakula first studied business and College before continuing his passion for the theatre. He moved to New York to pursue her career in 1976, where he found work on stage. After show off-Broadway and regional productions for several years, Bakula debuted on Broadway in 1983 to the musical Marilyn, playing the star‘s second husband, Joe DiMaggio baseball greats.
Breaking into television, Bakula passes expire in California. He filmed the tasks of comments on series such as My Sister Sam and Designing Women. He played in two series of short durations, Gung Ho and Eisenhower & Lutz, before returning to Broadway. In 1988, Bakula won raves for her performance in Romance/Romance. One critic said: “Bakula has the qualities of human leader of Cary Grant or Gregory Peck,” and stressed its «serious good-looking» and «clientelism smile.» The actor received a Tony Award nomination for his work on the show, which featured two different musicals.
“Quantum Leap.
Following the success of the Romance/Romance, Scott Bakula was cast in a new television series, Quantum Leap, opposite Dean Stockwell veteran actor. He played at Sam, a scientist who was transported to another time, another place and another person in each episode. He received numerous distinctions for her work on this series, including a Golden Globe Award and four Emmy Award. The show also proved to be very popular with viewers, lasting five seasons. More featured in the series, Bakula works behind the camera, a Director for several episodes.
During the execution of the Quantum Leap, Bakula has also taken on a few film roles. He appeared in the comedy of 1990 Sibling Rivalry with Kirstie Alley, Bill Pullman, Carrie Fisher. The following year, Bakula has once again shown his humorous side in the comedy sports unnecessary roughness. It addresses more pieces of film after quantum leap ended in 1993, but none match his success of television.